Program

Day 1 (Thursday, May 7, 2020)

Conference Centre Faculty of Medicine
Jagiellonian University Medical College
ul. św. Łazarza 16, 31-530 Kraków
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Conference

Clinical Cases in Internal Medicine: Learning Through Practice (9:00–14:00)

During this conference 20 selected case reports submitted to the Best Case Report Contest will be presented by the authors and discussed by experts recognized worldwide.

Hands-on workshops

Some workshops may overlap.
We advise you to check the schedule before registering.

 15:30–16:30

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. James Douketis (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 30
Fee:
30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 1 hour

Rationale: In the last decade, four direct oral anticoagulants have emerged as treatment options for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. Alongside heparins and vitamin K antagonists there is now a wide array of treatment options for the clinician. Choosing which anticoagulant to recommend can be challenging but important because each anticoagulant comes with therapeutic benefits and risks. There also is a need to match anticoagulant according to increasingly prevalent patient comorbidities that include coronary artery disease, renal insufficiency and bleeding predisposition, and for patients with cancer.

Learning objectives: At the end of this practical, case-based workshop, the participant will be able to:

  • Know how to identify the right anticoagulant for an individual patient, with or without specific comorbidities;
  • Gain a basic understanding of the key benefits and risks of different anticoagulants;
  • Deal with common “what if” clinical scenarios that occur during anticoagulant therapy.

 17:00–18:00

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. James Douketis (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 30
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 1 hour

Rationale: With an ageing population and associated increased use of anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for management of venous thromboembolism, the management of anticoagulant-associated bleeding has become a common clinical scenario. Although many clinicians are aware of how to manage acute bleeding, less is known about measures to prevent bleeding and what to do after the bleed. In the later instance, often challenging decisions are needed as to whether anticoagulants should be resumed, which anticoagulant to resume and, most importantly, when is the right timing of resumption.

Learning objectives: At the end of this practical, case-based workshop, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify preventive measures to minimize bleeding risk in patients who are started on anticoagulants;
  • Have an updated understanding of managing acute anticoagulant-related bleeding;
  • Gain an approach to managing patients “after the bleed”, including when and if to resume anticoagulants.

 14:00–15:00

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Simon Oczkowski (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 25
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 1 hour

Rationale: Intravenous (IV) fluid resuscitation remains a cornerstone in the management of seriously ill patients. Given in large volumes, IV fluids can exert significant effect upon serum electrolyte concentrations and acid-base status. Understanding these interactions assist with diagnosis and management of metabolically complex patients.

Learning objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, attendees will be familiarized with:

  • The interactions between acid-base status, electrolytes, and fluid therapy.
  • Three complementary approaches to interpreting acid-base disorders.
  • A practical, integrated approach to managing acid-base status, fluids, and electrolytes.

 9:00–11:30 for students only
 12:00–14:30
 15:30–18:00

Speakers and trainers:
Dr. Grzegorz Cebula (Jagiellonian University, Poland)
Max. number of participants: 16
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 2 hours 30 minutes

Rationale: Cardiac arrest is the most time-sensitive and demanding challenge faced by clinicians. In such scenarios, rapid assessment and life-saving treatments have to be implemented immediately.
The goal of this cardiac arrest simulation (CAS) workshop is to equip participants with practical skills. The workshop provides a number of stations with simulations of acute clinical situations.

Learning objectives: By the end of this workshop, the participants will be able to:

  • Understand the concept of CAS training, including the concept of role-playing and the importance of nontechnical skills in resuscitation attempts.
  • Understand the importance of teamwork and leadership in the management of cardiac arrest.
  • Understand the treatment algorithms of shockable and nonshockable rhythms.
  • Apply the current guidelines and skills taught in the workshop to practical management of the patient with cardiac arrest.
  • Apply the skills, attitude, and knowledge required to function as a member of a resuscitation team.
  • Apply the skills, attitude, and knowledge required to lead a resuscitation team.
  • Understand the use of nontechnical skills in cardiac arrest teams.

 9:00–11:15 Physicians
 11:45–14:00 for students only
 15:45–18:00

Speakers and trainers:
Dr. Grzegorz Cebula (Jagiellonian University, Poland)
Max. number of participants: 16
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 2 hours 15 minutes

Treatment of patients with life-threatening tachyarrhythmias poses a major challenge for the staff of intensive care units and hospital emergency departments. The workshop, run in high-fidelity simulation rooms that reconstruct conditions in the hospital ward, is designed to prepare doctors and students to perform electrocardiographic cardioversion procedures safely in both life-threatening and planned situations.

Learning objectives: By the end of this workshop, the participants will know:

  • Indications for electrical cardioversion.
  • Contraindications and possible complications of electrical cardioversion.
  • How to perform procedural analgosedation before cardioversion.
  • How to perform safe electrical cardioversion.
  • Principles of patient monitoring after cardioversion.

 9:00–11:00
 11:30–13:30
 16:00–18:00 for students only

Speakers and trainers:
Dr. Grzegorz Cebula (Jagiellonian University, Poland)
Max. number of participants: 12
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 2 hours

Securing the airway is frequently the most time-sensitive and anxiety-provoking challenge faced by clinicians. Although short, this is a highly intensive and hands-on workshop. It provides the opportunity to practice intubation using different laryngoscopy techniques.

Learning objectives: By the end of this workshop, the participants will know:

  • How to properly ventilate the patient using self-inflating bag-valve-mask ventilation technique.
  • How to prepare the equipment for intubation.
  • Indications and contraindications for intubation.
  • Possible complications of intubation.
  • How to safely intubate the patient using different laryngoscopy techniques.
To get the most out of this workshop, it is crucial that you attend the session prepared. Help us by familiarizing yourself with the following resources:

Introduction to Larynx, Pharynx, and Airway Anatomy
EEACC #4 – Direct Laryngoscopy
Direct vs. Video Laryngoscopy in 10 Minutes

 9:00–11:00
 11:30–13:30
 16:00–18:00

Speakers and trainers:
Dr. Grzegorz Cebula (Jagiellonian University, Poland)
Max. number of participants: 12
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 2 hours

Securing the airway and proper ventilation is frequently the most time-sensitive and anxiety-provoking challenge faced by clinicians. Supraglottic airway devices (laryngeal mask, laryngeal tube, I-Gel®) are reasonable alternatives for those healthcare providers who do not perform tracheal intubation frequently enough to be skillful in that procedure.
Although short, this is a highly intensive and hands-on workshop. It provides the opportunity to practice airway management and learn how to use supraglottic airway devices.

Learning objectives: By the end of this workshop, the participants will know:

  • How to properly ventilate the patient using self-inflating bag-valve-mask ventilation technique.
  • How to prepare the equipment for securing the airway with the laryngeal mask, laryngeal tube, I-Gel®.
  • Indications and contraindications for supraglottic airways.
  • Possible complications of supraglottic airways.
  • How to safely secure the airways using the laryngeal mask, laryngeal tube, I-Gel®.
To get the most out of this workshop, it is crucial that you attend the session prepared. Help us by familiarizing yourself with the following resources:

Supraglottic airway overview
Using supraglottic airways
Intubating through SGAs

 14:15–15:45 for students only
 16:15–17:45

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Julian Dobranowski (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 30
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Rationale: Despite the introduction of various technological advancements in medical imaging, the chest x-ray remains the most frequently requested radiological investigation. Learning how to interpret a chest x-ray is among the most important and challenging skills to master in caring for patients. However, many practicing physicians find themselves ill-equipped to make confident chest x-ray interpretations. The interpretive process need not stir up negative emotions. With the proper grounding in knowledge, procedures, and principles, chest x-ray interpretation can be rewarding to the learner and, more importantly, can lead to accurate extraction of information, leading to better patient outcomes.

Learning objectives: This workshop is designed to build your confidence in the interpretive process using a step-by-step algorithm. Participants will learn how to confidently distinguish between a normal and an abnormal chest x-ray and acquire specific interpretive skills that can be applied to daily practice. The workshop will also focus on practicing the newly acquired interpretive skills with numerous relevant clinical cases.

 12:00–13:30
 14:00–15:30
 16:15–17:45

Speakers and trainers:
Dr. Marzena Frolow (Jagiellonian University, Poland)
Max. number of participants: 16
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Rationale: B-mode compression ultrasound (CUS) has become the diagnostic modality of choice for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). CUS has high sensitivity and specificity for DVT. It allows for diagnosis at the point of care and decreased demand on radiology departmental services. Standard 3-point CUS includes examination of the upper femoral vein, lower femoral vein, and popliteal fossa. Some CUS’s protocols extend the test area to the veins of the calf.

Learning objectives: Attendees will be familiarized with:

  • Basic ultrasound unit settings for CUS.
  • Applied sonoanatomy of deep veins of lower extremities.
  • Technique of different protocols of CUS.
  • No basic skills in ultrasound examination are required from participants.

 10:00–18:00 Physicians

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Bhaskar Dasgupta (Southend University Hospital, UK)
Dr. Alwin Sebastian (Southend University Hospital, UK)
Dr. Marcin Milchert (Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, Poland)
Dr. Anetta Chrzanowska ( Department of Rheumatology, Jozef Dietl Hospital, Poland)
Dr. Monika Krężelok (Department of Rheumatology, Jozef Dietl Hospital, Poland)
Max. number of participants: 25
Fee: 90 €
Eligible participants: Physicians
Duration: 7 hours

Rationale: This course is designed to deliver practical clinical aids for the diagnosis and management of giant cell arteritis (GCA) and large vessel vasculitis (LVV). It also incorporates an ultrasound workshop for scanning the temporal and axillary arteries with live demonstration and supervised hands-on scanning.

Learning objectives: Attendees will learn how to make a secure early diagnosis of GCA in a fast-track setting. Various manifestations of cranial, large vessel and ischemic disease will be discussed. The fast-track pathway will be detailed along with a GCA probability score to categorize referrals into low, intermediate, and high probability categories. The role of vascular ultrasound in this setting will be discussed with a probability-based diagnostic algorithm. Pitfalls including mimicking pathologies will be mentioned.
Attendees will learn about the recent EULAR recommendations on imaging in GCA and LVV. The ultrasound lesions in the temporal and axillary arteries will be detailed along with training and setting requirements of sonographer, probes and machines. The newly described Quantitative Halo Score will be discussed along with role of ultrasound in prognosis, diagnosis and monitoring of the disease.
Attendees will learn about PET-CT scanning and other forms of imaging for assessment of extent and severity of disease. Various case histories, patterns as well as pitfalls of PET-CT imaging in LVV will be detailed.
Attendees will learn about GCA current management and will be made familiar with recent advances in biologics therapy as well as clinical trials that are ongoing or in setup.
Attendees will learn about use of tocilizumab in GCA, the landmark GiACTA trial, and use of tocilizumab in clinical practice particularly to treat patients with severe, relapsing, refractory disease. Case histories will be discussed with nursing standards required.
The ultrasound workshop will include advice on equipment settings, live demonstrations and a session for hands-on practice.

Program
10:00–13:00 Part 1 

  • Fast track clinics and pathway for GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica
  • Probability-based diagnostic algorithm for GCA
  • Imaging in GCA, polymyalgia rheumatica and LVV
  • Treatment advances including tocilizumab in GCA
  • Procedure for temporal and axillary artery ultrasound
13:00–14:00 Lunch break
14:00–18:00 Part 2 
  • Lecture and live demonstration of optimal ultrasound settings
  • Live demonstration of temporal and axillary artery ultrasound
  • Hands-on session: temporal and axillary ultrasound in normal and GCA

 9:00–12:00

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Małgorzata Nowaczyk (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 10
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Students and professionals interested in close reading of literary works as means of developing empathy.
Duration: 3 hours

Rationale: Narrative medicine is medicine practiced with the narrative competence to recognize, interpret, and be moved to action by the predicaments of others. Illness unfolds in stories and it can be said that illness is a call for stories. As clinicians, we enter patients’ lives at time of great disruption, when the narrative thread of an ordinary life is interrupted by illness. The better we are at attending these narrative complexities, the better we are at providing effective and humane care. By writing about the patient using non-medical language, either for ourselves or for sharing with other health-care practitioners, we may discover true needs of the patient and be better able to advocate for the patient’s wishes and desires. Narrative medicine training improves attention by teaching close reading of literary works while writing in the shadow of a literary text teaches self-reflection. In turn, attention and self-reflection lead to improved patient care.

Learning objectives: By the end of the session, participants will:

  • Be able to define the elements of narrative medicine and their use in furthering engagement.
  • Be able to describe the tools of close reading as used in narrative medicine.
  • Experience the effects of close reading and of writing in the shadow of a literary work.

 14:30–16:00
 16:30–18:00

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Gordon Guyatt (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 25
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Healthcare professionals interested in producing or using clinical practice guidelines
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Rationale: Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) became the cornerstone of knowledge translation / continuous medical education.  There are numerous CPG affecting behaviours of every clinician.  The confidence which we may put I such CPG differ depending on the process used in their construction.

Learning objectives: At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be familiarized with:

  • For those planning to produce CPG – steps to adhere to;
  • For those using CPG - the way to assess which CPG are to be believed;
  • Concepts of quality of evidence and strength of recommendation;
  • Role of values in preferences.

 14:30–16:00
 16:30–18:00

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Holger Schunemann (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 12
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Rationale: Ability to critically appraise a systematic review, which is central to the practice of EBM.

Content: This workshop will use an example of recent meta-analysis of general interest to illustrate the key elements of assessing the quality of a systematic review and the trustworthiness of the results it reports.

Objectives:

  • To learn how to assess key elements of the quality of a systematic review, including question definition, search for evidence and summarization of evidence.
  • To learn how to evaluate the credibility of the results presented in a systematic review, including issues of study design, risk of bias, precision, directness and publication bias.

 9:00–10:30

Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students

 11:00–12:30

Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students

 14:00–15:30

Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students

 16:00–17:30

Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students

 11:30–13:30

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Poonam Hosamani (Stanford University, USA)
Prof. Andrew Elder (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Max. number of participants: 25
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians and students
Duration: 2 hours

Rationale: Physicians spend little time at the bedside in the modern hospital. Lack of time at the bedside has led to a decline in fundamental skills such as the physical examination, and threatens the physician-patient relationship, in addition to contributing to physician burnout. Many clinicians lack the confidence to model and teach bedside skills in front of their colleagues and trainees and lack the communication skills to include the patient as an active participant in the teaching process. At Stanford University, we have developed a unique, patient-centered model for teaching effectively at the bedside, understanding the time constraints that many students and trainees experience. We will demonstrate the power of the 5-minute Bedside Moment (5M2) as a way to teach the physical exam and model essential communication techniques. Participants will have the opportunity to create their own 5M2 that can be used as a teaching tool at their home institution.

Learning objectives: At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the components of the 5-minute Bedside Moment (5M2)
  • Create their own 5-minute Bedside Moment (5M2) to teach bedside skills to learners.
  • Demonstrate the 5-minute Bedside Moment to colleagues and obtain feedback on pedagogical style

 14:00–16:00

Speakers and trainers:
Prof. Teresa Chan (McMaster University, Canada)
Max. number of participants: 20
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Students and professionals interested in serious games and/or teaching about complex systems
Duration: 2 hours

Rationale: The emergency department (ED) is one of the busiest places in a hospital and can often be overwhelming and difficult for learners to understand. A safe way to understand the processes within such an environment is simulation; a branch of simulation that has yet to be capitalized fully is the serious game, a game in which the objective is learning rather than fun. GridlockED was developed to help medical trainees better understand the workings of the ED and provide a low-risk way to practice managing patients in multi-patient environments. In this game, participants role play providers (nurses, emergency physicians, resident, radiologists, and consultants). Participants draw cards who become the patients they must take care of in each round. Participants will also be able to move around the providers to manage these patients in the most efficient manner. Each round may have its own set of challenges such as low number of staff or beds and through these challenges, participants are encouraged to work together. Using our game as a case study in the workshop, we hope to teach medical educators about how serious games can be used in medical education.

Instructional methods: There will be a short didactic component where we will provide a history of the game’s development and how it works. Attendees will then be divided into groups of 6–8 to play a game of GridlockED, which will be guided by the facilitators. The workshop will end with a debrief and discussion where we will debate the merits of the game and compare it to other classroom based strategies. Participants will be guided to consider how and where serious gaming may be useful in their own disciplines.

Learning objectives: By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role of and problems with serious games; 
  • Compare how a serious game and other classroom based strategies differ in their ability to teach certain topics (e.g. collaborating with other healthcare professionals)
  • Play the GridlockED game, and begin thinking about opportunities in their own disciplines to design a serious game.

 9:00–11:00 for medical educators only

Speakers and trainers:
Dr. Inga Hege (University of Augsburg, Germany)
Dr. Małgorzata Sudacka (Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Poland)
Dr. Andrzej Kononowicz (Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Poland)
Prof. Steven Durning (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, USA)
Max. number of participants: 25
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: Physicians, nurses, paramedics
Duration: 2 hours

Rationale: The high incidence of medical errors is a burning issue across healthcare institutions worldwide. A considerable proportion of adverse events may be avoided if healthcare professionals develop better clinical reasoning abilities during their studies and deepen them more effectively in the workplace. Clinical reasoning encompasses a complex set of abilities applied in the thinking and decision-making processes associated with clinical practice. It includes, but is not limited to, such tasks as data gathering, interpreting, and synthesising information from various sources, as well as generating hypotheses, diagnoses and management plans. Yet, despite the importance of this topic to the healthcare professions practice, many teachers struggle with how to explicitly teach their students clinical reasoning abilities. In this interactive session we intend to highlight and contextualise in a discussion with the audience the most prevalent barriers in the explicit teaching of clinical reasoning that are commonly encountered in health professions education. Grounding this discussion informed by evidence from the literature and experiences collected by the participants of the EU-funded project DID-ACT, we will offer the participants a variety of strategies and potential solutions to overcome these difficulties. In small group discussions we will foster the use of strategies in their particular medical or healthcare schools.

Learning objectives: At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and reflect on barriers that inhibit explicit teaching of clinical reasoning.
  • Name methods for how to explicitly teach clinical reasoning in various contexts.
  • Develop ideas on how to overcome barriers for explicit clinical reasoning teaching at one's own institution.

 9:00–11:00 for medical educators only

Speakers and trainers:
Dr. Mark Westwood (UEMS Council of European Specialist Medical Assessment, UK)
Max. number of participants: 12 (3 groups of 4)
Fee: 30 €
Eligible participants: All those involved in assessment and education of trainees, and those involved or thinking of using postgraduate assessment
Duration: 2 hours

Rationale: There are many different methods of assessment of knowledge but a common method used is the “single best answer from five choices’ style multiple choice question (MCQ). Multiple choice test items have several potential advantages, such as ease of marking, reliability and validity. They also have several limitations in terms of curriculum coverage and what they are able to assess in terms of ‘being a good doctor.’ It is important to not only be able to develop high quality MCQ’s but also to understand where they fit into the overall picture of postgraduate assessment.

Learning objectives: At the end of this workshop, participants will:

    Understand the advantages and limitations of this type of MCQ’s.
  • Have an understanding of how to form an MCQ (stem, question, test items and distractors).
  • Understand the basics of how to interpret results from an MCQ examination.
  • Know to work in teams to develop high quality MCQ questions.

  Workshop schedule

Day 2 (Friday, May 8, 2020)

ICE Kraków Congress Centre
ul. Marii Konopnickiej 17, 30-302 Kraków
See on map

8:30–9:00

Welcome and introduction

Organizing Committee

9:00–9:25

Opening lecture
Is physical examination of the cardiovascular system still important?

Prof. Andrew Elder

University of Edinburgh, UK

Session I

9:25–9:50

What's new in the management of chronic heart failure

Prof. Harriette Van Spall

McMaster University, Canada

9:50–10:15

Acute pulmonary embolism: how to diagnose quickly and treat effectively

Prof. Adam Torbicki

Center of Postgraduate Medical Education, Poland

10:15–10:40

Infective endocarditis: prophylaxis and management according to current guidelines

To be announced

10:40–11:05

Management of chronic coronary syndromes according to the latest practice guidelines

Prof. William Wijns

National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland

11:05–11:40

Questions & answers

All speakers

11:40–12:10

Refreshment break

Session II

12:10–12:35

Hemoglobinopathies: when to worry

Prof. Madeleine Verhovsek

McMaster University, Canada

12:35–13:00

Von Willebrand disease: the most common bleeding disorder

Prof. Mark Crowther

McMaster University, Canada

13:00–13:25

Nephrological emergencies

Prof. Jürgen Floege

RWTH Aachen University, Germany

13:25–13:50

Questions & answers

All speakers

13:50–14:30

Lunch break

Session III

14:30–14:55

Management of antiphospholipid syndrome according to the latest practice guidelines

Prof. Kim Legault

McMaster University, Canada

14:55–15:20

Muscle pain, muscle weakness and muscle inflammation: from symptoms to diagnosis

Prof. Bhaskar Dasgupta

Southend University Hospital, UK

15:20–15:45

Early arthritis: how to manage in general practice

Prof. Daniel Aletaha

Medical University of Vienna, Austria

15:45–16:10

Questions & answers

All speakers

16:10–16:30

Refreshment break

Session IV

16:30–16:55

Metabolic surgery in prevention of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes remission

Dr. Dror Dicker

Tel Aviv University, Israel

16:55–17:20

New oral anticoagulants: when and how to use

Prof. James Douketis

McMaster University, Canada

17:20–17:45

How to keep a patient away from ICU

Prof. Waleed Alhazzani

McMaster University, Canada

17:45–18:10

Keynote lecture: Thirty years of EBM evolution: from the history to the future

Prof. Gordon Guyatt

McMaster University, Canada

18:10–18:35

Questions & answers

All speakers

18:35–20:00

Dinner at the venue

Day 3  (Saturday, May 9, 2020)

ICE Kraków Congress Centre
ul. Marii Konopnickiej 17, 30-302 Kraków
See on map

9:00–9:25

Opening lecture
Narrative medicine: is there a place for it in today’s healthcare systems?

Prof. Malgorzata Nowaczyk

McMaster University, Canada

Session V

9:25–9:50

Pleural fluid on a chest X-ray: how to reach a diagnosis

To be announced

9:50–10:15

Treating COPD in 2020: key messages for everyday practice

Prof. Jadwiga Wedzicha

Imperial College London, UK

10:15–10:40

Community acquired pneumonia: an update

Prof. Mark Loeb

McMaster University, Canada

10:40–11:05

Challenges in diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis

Prof. Jyotirmoy Pal

R.G. Kar Medical College, India

11:05–11:40

Questions & answers

All speakers

11:40–12:15

Refreshment break

Session VI

12:15–12:40

Challenges in choosing a medication for type 2 diabetes

Prof. René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez

Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Mexico

12:40–13:05

Current management of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and other hypothyroid states

Prof. Leonard Wartofsky

Georgetown University, USA

13:05–13:30

When supplementation of vitamin D is justified

Prof. Bess Dawson-Hughes

Tufts University School of Medicine, USA

13:30–13:45

Best Case Report Contest awards

13:45–14:10

Questions & answers

All speakers

14:10–14:50

Lunch break

Session VII

14:50–15:15

Current management of gastroparesis

Prof. Irene Sarosiek

Texas Tech University, USA

15:15–15:40

Irritable bowel syndrome diagnosis and management: a simplified algorithm for clinical practice

Prof. Paul Moayyedi

McMaster University, Canada

15:40–16:05

Evaluating obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding: what every internist needs to know

Prof. Ian Gralnek

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

16:05–16:30

Questions & answers

All speakers

16:30–16:50

Refreshment break

Session VIII

16:50–17:15

Assessment and symptomatic treatment of chronic breathlessness

Prof. David Currow

University of Technology Sydney, Australia

17:15–17:40

Holistic breathlessness services: improving mastery and reducing distress caused by breathlessness

Prof. Irene Higginson

Cicely Saunders Institute, King's College London, UK

17:40–18:05

Management of cancer pain according to the latest WHO guidelines

Prof. Małgorzata Krajnik

Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Poland

18:05–18:30

Questions & answers

All speakers

18:30

Closing remarks

Organizing Committee

EFIM Day (Friday, May 8, 2020)

ICE Kraków Congress Centre
ul. Marii Konopnickiej 17, 30-302 Kraków
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Session A 

Moderators:

Dr. Dror Dicker, EFIM President-Elect, Israel
Prof. Giancarlo Agnelli, EFIM Editor-in-Chief, Italy

9:30–10:00

Opening lecture
How to recognize trustworthy practice guidelines?

Prof. Gordon Guyatt, McMaster University, Canada

10:00–10:45

Debate: What is the first line therapy in DMT2 patients?
Metformin?

Prof. René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Mexico

GLP1/SGLT2?

Prof. Petra-Maria Schumm-Draeger, Center for Internal Medicine/Fünf Höfe München, Germany

10:45–11:30

Debate: Should we give thromboprophylaxis to every Padua score >4 patient in internal medicine department?
Yes:

Prof. Cecilia Becattini, University of Perugia, Italy

No:

Prof. James Douketis, McMaster University, Canada

11:30–11:45

Coffee Break

Session B

Moderators:

Prof. Xavier Corbella, EFIM Secretary General, Spain
Prof. Runólfur Pálsson, EFIM Past President, Iceland

11:45–12:00

Lecture: Opportunities for multidisciplinary care of cardiac patients

Prof. William Wijns, National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland

12:00–12:40

Debate: How low should we go in hypertensive patients?
Lower is better:

Prof. Alejandro de la Sierra, University of Barcelona, Spain

Lower is not always better:

Prof. Dragan Lovic, Clinic for Internal Disease Intermedica, Serbia

12:40–13:20

Debate: How low should we go in hypercholesterolemia treatment?
Lower is better:

Prof. Avishay Elis, Tel-Aviv University, Israel

Lower is not always better:

Prof. Richard Češka, Charles University, Czech Republic

13:20–14:00

Lunch Break

Session C

Moderators:

Prof. Nicola Montano, President, EFIM, Italy
Prof. Valentin Kokorin, EFIM Treasurer, Russian Federation

14:00–14:25

Lecture: Vaccination: mandatory or non-mandatory?

Prof. Serhat Unal, Hacettepe University, Turkey

14:25–14:50

Lecture: Cancer and anticoagulation

Prof. Giancarlo Agnelli, University of Perugia, Italy

14:50–15:15

Lecture: How to adapt outside clinical practice guideline to your own country or setting

Prof. Holger Schunemann, McMaster University, Canada

15:15–15:40

Lecture: Physician’s well-being

Prof. Cynthia D. Smith, American College of Physicians, USA

15:40–16:10

Closing lecture: Personalised internal medicine: great promise or the emperor’s clothes?

Prof. Marcel Levi, University College London, UK

Friday, May 8 at 8 PM

ICE Kraków Congress Centre
ul. Marii Konopnickiej 17, 30-302 Kraków
See on map

ANNA MARIA JOPEK & KROKE

The fusion of two exceptional worlds of sensibility and sound – created by Anna Maria Jopek and KROKE – is where the true magic happens.

Inspired by traditional music and, at the same time, full of innovative means that define forms and colors, their original music draws from various cultures and voices of the past.
Their eclectic style features ethnic, jazz, classical, klezmer, and even electronic music, and therefore cannot be simply classified into one genre. Experiencing their music, listeners immerse themselves in deep unexplored areas sparkling with thousands of colors.

Many times, these sounds have proven to be excellent theater music and film themes – evocative, full of meanings, thus leaving plenty of space for imagination.
The artists like to describe themselves as improvisers, space and time travelers. The project brings together two extraordinary voices of our times – one female and one male, which adds universality to its musical message.

This event is fully funded by Medycyna Praktyczna. It is not financed by INFARMA member companies.

KROKE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kroke
Anna Maria Jopek: http://annamariajopek.pl/en/

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